Plan of Action for the Elimination of Harmful Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children

E/CN.4/Sub.2/1994/10/Add.1
Download full text: English
Year of adoption: 1994
Year of entry into force:
Region:
Legal Status:

Excerpts

 

(1) A clear expression of political will and an undertaking to put an end to traditional practices affecting the health of women and girl children, particularly female circumcision, is required on the part of the Governments of countries concerned.

[…]

(12) Cooperation with religious institutions and their leaders and with traditional authorities is required in order to eliminate traditional practices such as female circumcision which are harmful to the health of women and children.

[…]

(14) The family being the basic institution from where gender biases emanate, wide-ranging motivational campaigns should be launched to educate parents to value the worth of a girl child, so as to eliminate such biases.

[…]

(15) In view of the scientific fact that male chromosomes determine the sex of children, it is necessary to emphasize that the mother is not responsible for selection. Governments must, therefore, actively attempt to change the misconceptions regarding the responsibilities of the mother in determining the sex of the child.

[…]

(17) In the light of the dominant role religion plays in shaping the image of women in each society, efforts should be made to remove misconceptions in religious teachings which reinforce the unequal status of women.

[…]

(20) Considering the importance of promoting self-esteem as a prerequisite for their higher status of women in the family and the community, Governments should take effective measures to ensure that women have access to and have control over economic resources, including land, credit, employment and other institutional facilities.

(21) Measures must be taken to provide free health care and services to women and children (in particular, girls) and to promote health consciousness among women with emphasis on their own basic health needs.

[…]

(32) Health issues relating to sex and family life education should be included in the school curricula to promote responsible and harmonious parenthood and to create awareness among young people about the harmful effects of early marriage, as well as the need for education about sexually transmitted diseases, especially AIDS.

[…]

(34) Effective training programmes should be ensured for traditional birth attendants and paramedical personnel to equip them with the necessary skills and knowledge, including concerning the effects of harmful traditional practices, to provide care and services during the ante-natal, child delivery and post-natal periods, especially for rural mothers.

(35) Governments should promote male contraception, as well as female contraception.

[…]

(37) Governments should recognize and promote the reproductive rights of women, including their right to decide on the number and spacing of their children.

[…]

(39) Contraception should be encouraged as a means of promoting the health of women and children rather than as a means of achieving demographic goals.

[…]

(41) Governments should expand and improve health services and introduce training programmes for traditional birth attendants to upgrade their positive traditional skills, as well as to give them new skills on a priority basis.

 

 

PDF / Print